Students Learning Through Urban Gardening (SLUG)

Welcome to SLUG's home on the web!

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The SLUG program guides teachers and students step-by-step through "planting to harvesting" growing and short-duration garden-related activities during the Boston Public School System season.

SLUG provides support and materials for the following areas:
  • INDOOR GROWING (under grow lights)
  • INDOOR COMPOSTING (worm bins)
  • OUTDOOR GROWING (warm and cold weather)
  • OUTDOOR COMPOSTING (bins)




Focus on: OUTDOOR GROWING

Weeks 1-2
Weeks 3-4
Weeks 5-6
Weeks 9-10
Weeks 13-14
Weeks 15-16
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When to Plant
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Germination in the Cold DIT
Set Up a Pop Up Greenhouse
Thinning Seedlings EDIT
Hardening Off Plants
Common PestsEDIT
Getting Ready for SummerEDIT



Focus on: OUTDOOR COMPOSTING
Composting is easy! Once you have your bin set up, follow these simple steps to make compost:
  1. Add high carbon materials ("browns"), such as fall leaves, straw, salt marsh hay, shredded paper and cardboard (newspaper, paper towels, paper plates, paper bags), chipped brush, sawdust, pine needles (pine needles should not make up more than 10% of the total material in the pile).
  2. Add high nitrogen materials ("greens"), such as grass clippings, weeds (not laden with seeds), vegetable and fruit wastes, seaweed, eggshells, coffee grounds and filters, tea bags, manure (horse, cow, rabbit, chicken, goat, gerbil, etc).
  3. Mix or layer materials: Every 12" or so add a few shovelsful of rich soil or compost.
  4. Keep it damp and turn with a shovel or pitchfork to keep it aerated. Wait a few months, and voila—black gold! NOTE: For best results, and to keep out odors and pests, do not add: meat, bones, fat grease, oils, peanut butter, dairy products (cheese, butter, milk, eggs), cooked foods with sauces or butter, dog or cat manure, diseased plants, weeds gone to seed, or weeds that spread by roots and runners (vines).
(Courtesy of The Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection)